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1940 






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Norwell Public Library 



Volume 8 



The Shipbuilder 



Number 1 





i 




Mi m 


V^u 5J 


1 W "': &' 




*^*^»^*^j 



Scaled: I. to R— IV Gleason, M. Stoddard, W. Osberg, S. Luce, (.. Goldman, V. Gaudette. 
Standing: R. Mutt, M. Skelding, W. O.bom. |. Paradis, I). Burnside, H. Maybury, 

M. Roman. 



THE SHIPBUILDER STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief . 

Assistant Chief . 

Business Manager 

English Editors . 

General Sews 

Athletics 

Advertising Mgrs. 

Art 

Specialties . 

Fore i on Languages 

Soiid I Science 

Economics 

Home Economics 

Commercial 

St ienee 



Stanford Luce 
. Willard Osberg 

Robert Motl 

Gertrude Goldman, Barbara Clark 

. Howard Max bury 

Virginia Gaudette, \V slc\ Osborn 

. Donald Burnside, Joseph Paradis 

Robert Newcomb, Bethany Gleason 

Robert Newcomb, Joseph Paradis 

Mary Skelding 

Joseph Paradis, Gertrude Goldman 

. Majorie Stoddard 

Margarei Roman, Faustina Longlej 

. Howard Maybury, Robert Molt 

Barbara Clark 



EDITORIAL 



Epochs jxiss as rivers flow; 
Faster, faster while they go 
On their journey to the sea 
Through the Gate of Destin . 
Gate of Destiny; passed at Graduation; readied b; three conquests <>r sups of life- 
Happiness, Comradeship, and Learning. 

Three steps: merely a bauble! Certainly but worthless things. Yet in each step there 
thrives the chance to elevate oneself toward the eternal goal of all men. success. 

Gate of Destiny, always open, and yet ever shut. A Gate ever accessible to those who 
learn — to those who have learned — to those who will leant. Each step to the Gate 
of Destiny is not a stumbling block but is an opportunity to lead a worthy life. Liu 
acquisition of each new elevation furthers the brain successively, until at last the peak 
is icached and the Gate of Destiny is approached and passed. 

Bevond the Gate, in Fertile plains, lay the future hopes and careers <>l the world 
Marchonsl 

STANFORD LUCE, JR. 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Three 




Stated: L to R— Miss Folsom, Mr. Johnston, Mrs. Turner, Mr. Thayer, Mrs. Cole, Miss 
Bowlin, Miss Harris. Standing: Mr. Sipple, Miss Hurley, Mr. Graham, Mrs. Osborn, Mr. 

Booth, Miss Jenkins. 



THE FACULTY 



Mr. Gordon Thayer 
Mrs. Lois Turner 
Miss Marion Hurley 
MissChoris Jenkins 
Mr. Norman Sipple 
Miss Martha Harris 
Mr. Julian Graham 
Mr. George fohnston 
Mrs. Ella Osborn 
Mrs. Grace Cole 
Miss Lorinda Fulsom 
Mr. Rodman Booth 
Miss Myrtle Bowlin 
Mi. Thomas B. Rush 



Principal 

Commerce 

Foreign Language 

Domestic Science 

Science 

Mathematics 

Social Science 

English 

(hade 4 

('•rade 5 

Grade fr 

Ait Supervisor 



Music Supervisor 
Superintendent of Schools 

St hool Committee 

Mrs. Nellie L. Sparrell Mr. Janus Hall 

Mr. Horace Gaudette 



Pane four 



The Shipbuilder 



...GRADUATES... 



DONALD BURNSIDE, General 

A win/iing way of (heat Reserve 

He likes the Indies and has the nerve. 

[nterclass Play 1, 2, 3. 4; Camera Club Pres. 3; Aviation Club 2; 
Monitor 3; Pageant Stage Mgr. 3; Tri-Town Plays 2, 3; Dramatic 
Ciub 1; Shipbuilder Staff 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4. 



I* *& 



BARBARA CLARK, College 

The mildest manners and the gentlest heart —Pope 

Spent 1,2. 3 in Washington, D. C. High Schools; Dramatic Club 
I; Shipbuilder Staff 4: Hockey 4: Basketball 4; Dinghy Stall 4; 
Tri-Town Play 4; [nterclass Play 4. 



ROSE FENECK, Commercial 

The fashion wears out more apparel than the man. 

[nterclass Play I, 3; Dramatic Club 3. I; lit- I own Play 4; Ship- 
builder Staff I; Basketball I. 2; 60 and SO word Shorthand tei- 
lificate; 4-H Club 4. 



VIRGINIA GAUDETTE, College 
A simple maiden in her flower 
Is worth a hundred coats of arms. 

[nterclass l'la\s 1. I: Tri-Town Play 2: Monitor 3, I: Sports 
Club 3: Studenl Council 3. I: Secretary Student Council I: Camera 
Club I; Vice Presidenl 3; Basketball 2. 3. 4; Field Hockc\ I, 
badminton 3; Capt. Monitors 1; Shipbuildei Stall I; Dinghy 
Si. ill I: Special Privilege Card I: Honoi Student; National Honui 





BETHANY GLEASON, College 
Her voice teas evei soli. 

Gentle, and low. an excellent thing in woman —Shakespeare 
[nterclass Play I. '_'. 3. I: Candidate for Snow Queen l; French 
Club 3; Shipbuilder Stall 3. I; Student Council 3. I: Dramatic 
Club 1; Tri-Town Play I; Secretary 2; Badminton 3: Basketball 
2.3. I; Dinghy Stall I; Handbook Committee l; Special Privilege 
Card I: Cheer leader 10. 



GERTRUDE GOLDMAN, College 

You <(in demonstrate an emotion or fnove an aspiration— Moi h v 
[nterclass Plaj I. 2. 3. I; Vice President I: Dramatic Club 2. I: 
French Club 3; Shipbuilder Stall 3. I: Dingln Stall 3. I: National 
Honor Societ) 3. I: Kssa\ Contest 3. I: Special Privilege Card l; 
1). A. R. Good Citizenship Medal; Student Council 3: Handbook 
Committee 3. I; Honor Student; Typing Certificate. 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Five 



...GRADUATES... 



FAILS UNA LONGLEY, General 
Words are worth in lull and cost little. 

Spent 1, 2, 3 in Woodstock, Vermont, High Schools; Presideni 
of 4 H Club 4. 



-Hubert 



STANFORD LUCE, College 

And still the wonder grew 

Hoir one small head could carry all he knew— 

Interclass Play 1. 3. 4; President 1, 4; Secretary 3: Students 
Council 2, 4; Shipbuilder Stall 3, 4; Dinghy Stall 4; First Aid Club 
3; French Club 3; Monitor 2; Essay Contest 3: National Honor 
Society Vice-Pres. 3; National Honor Society Pres. 4; Banquet 
Toastmaster 3; Dramatic Club Sec. I: Tri-Town Pla\ 4; Special 
Privilege Card 4; Asst. Basketball Mgr. 3: Basketball Mgr. 4; 
Typing Certificate; Handbook Committee 3; Chairman Hand- 
book 4, Baseball 4; High Honor Student. 

HOWARD MAYBIRY. Commercial 
n> boil at different degrees. 

Interclass Plays 2. 4; Capt. of Monitors 4; Pageant 3: Ship- 
builder Staff 4; Badminton Champion 4: Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball Mgr. 3; Baseball 4; First Aid Club 2; 60 Word Shorthand 
Certificate; Typing Certificate; Badminton Club 4. 



WARREN MERRITT, Commercial 

Most men keep their heads, but lose their heaits. 

Aviation Club 2; Monitor 3; Interclass Plays 3; Baseball 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 2; Badminton Club 4. 



ROBERT MO IT, Commercial 
Bashful, but masterful. 

Aviation Club 2; Monitor 3; Basketball I. 2. 3. 4; Basketball 
Captain 3. I; Spoils Club 2: School Treasurer 3: Student Council 

1 rt ■-isurtr ! Special Pn\ liege C ud I National Honor Scciet\ I 
Shipbuilder Stall I; Senior Class Pageant 3: Badminton Club I; 
First Aid Club 2: Baseball Mgr. I; 60 Word Shorthand Certificate; 

I \ ping Certificate. 



ROBERT NEWCOMB, General 

On the stage natural, simple, affecting; 

'Twos only that when he was off, he -was acting.— Goldsmith 
Interclass Plays I. 2. 3. I; Tri-Town Pla\s 2. 3. i: Class Presi- 
dent 2. 3; Dramatii Club 2: Vice Pies. I; Camera Club 3: Monitor 
3: Student Council 3. I; Shipbuilder Stall 3. I: Dingh) Stafl 2. 3: 
Badminton Club I; Banquet foastmaster 1.2,4; Cheei Leadei 2. 









Page Six 



The Shipbuilder 




...GRADUATES... 








WESLEY OSBORNE, Commercial 

For women may come and women may go; 

Hut I go on forever. 

Aviation Club 2; Monitor 3: Interclass l'la\ 3; Pageant 3: 
School Treasurer 4: Treasurer 4: Student Council Treasure] 4; 
Baseball 1. 2. 3. 4; Basketball 3. 4: Typing Certificate; Shipbuilder 
Staff 4. 



EUNICE PAIGE, General 

A great interpreter of life ought not nerd interpretation. 

—Enu rson 

Glee Club 4. 



JOSEPH PARADIS, General 

/;/ the life of a young man the most essential thing for happiness 
is the gift of friendship. — Os.ii 

Interclass Plays 1. 2, 3. 1: Aviation Club 2: Camera Club 3; 
Capt. of Monitors 3: Monitoi I; Tri-Town Plays 1; Nail Honor 
Society I; Shipbuilder Stall I; Dramatic Club I; Kssi\ Contest !: 
Basketball 3, 1; Pageant 3: Special Privilege Caul I. 



SHIRLEY PORTER, Commercial 

Well, poor sailors took their chance; I take mine.— Browning 
Interclass Plays I. 2. 3. I; Dramatic Club 2. I; Honor Societ) 3: 
Treasurer 3; Tri-Town Plays I: Shipbuildei Mail l: 60 and R0 
Word Shorthand Certificates; Typing Certificate; I II Club 3: 
Cheer Leadei I. 



BARBARA SCO I I , College 

/ at^iee xeitti no man's opinion 

I have some of my own. —Dumas 

Drama tit Club 1; Spoils club 3; Interclass Plays 2. 3: Voile) 
Ball 3; Badminton Club 3; l\pin<; (bib I: Honoi Socicl) 1: 
Shipbuildei Stall I: Basketball 1.2.3. I; Typing Certificate. 



MARY SKELDING, College 

You) constitution is all sail and no anchor. 

Interclass Plays 2. 3; National Honor Society 3. I: Sec.. Iiciv 
Nat'l Honor Society I: Tri-Town Plays 3. I: French Club 3 
Shipbuildei Stall 4: I)iuj^li\ Stall I: Dramatic Club I: Vice 
President I; Special Privilege Card I: Basketball 3: Basketball 
\1 <4 1 . I: Honor Student. 
Socicix I: Dramatic Club 2; Typing Certificate. 



The Shipbuilder 



Paqe Seven 



...GRADUATES... 



MARJORIE STODDARD. Commercial 

And whereso'er thou move, good luck 
Shall fling her old shoe after. 

Interclass Play 3; 4-H Club 3; National Honor Society 1: Glee 
Club 1; Shipbuilder Staff 4; 60 and 80 Word Shorthand Cer- 
tificates. 



MIRIAM PERRY, Commercial 
Nothing is impossible to a willing heart. 
4-H Club 1. 



-Proverb 



LINWOOD SOUSA, Commercial 

I've a neater, sweeter maiden in a cleaner, greener land.— Kipling 
First Aid Club 2; Badminton Club 4; Baseball 4; Typing Cer- 
tificate; Sports Club 2. 



ELEANOR BELL, General 

A good reputation is more valuable than money — Publilius Sxrus 
Dramatic Club 2; Interclass Plays 2. 3, 4; Tri-Town Pla\ 3: 
Glee Club 4; Sports Club 3. 



ELIZABETH MESHEAU, College 

The highest of distinctions is service to others. —King George 
Interclass Plays 1, 2, 3. 4; Dramatic Club 2, I: Treasure! I: 
Secretary 4; Sports Club 3; Candidate for Snow Queen 4; Special 
Privilege Card 4: Natl Honor Society 4; Basketball Z. 3, 1; Bad 
minton 3: Shipbuilder Staff 4; Honor Student. 







RICHARD CUMMINGS, Commercial 
Though somewhat tard\ I perchance arrive. 
Basketball 3; Interclass Pla> 4. 



Page eight 



The Shipbuilder 



CLASS STATISTICS 



CLASS OFFICERS 
President — Stanford Luce 
Vice President — Mary Skelding 
Secretary — Elizabeth Mesheau 
Treasurer — Wesley Osborne 
Class Adviser — Mrs. Turner 
Motto — "He Conquers who Conquers 
Himself" 
Class Colors — Blue and White 
(Boys wearing blue gowns; Cirls, white) 
Class Flower— Red Rose 
COMMENCEMENT 
Banquet and Class Night Exercises — 
June 13 
Historian — Elizabeth Mesheau 
Prophet — Joseph Paradis 
Will — Robert Newcomb 
Poet — Gertrude Goldman 
Toastmaster— Robert Newcomb 
Class Marshal — Robert Kenyon '41 

Baccalaureate Sermon — June 16 
First Parish Church, Norwell Center 
Rev. Alfred J. Wilson, Pastor 
GRADUATION - June IS 
Subject — "Youth Yesterday, Today and 
Tomorrow" 
Speakers 
Stanford Luce Gertrude Goldman 

Mary Skelding Virginia Gaudette 

PROMENADE - June 19 
CLASS POEM 
"Our Bridge" 
We have a bridge to build. 
A bridge to span our life; 
To rise above our troubles, 
And free us of all strife. 

Designed by ideals and ambition, 
Modeled by labor and strain, 
This bridge musi be a symbol 
Of all that we hope to attain. 

We've gathered our tools together 
During the years of our education; 
.And now at last we're ready 
To build our bridge foundation. 

A world lies open before us 
As we leave these sheltering folds; 
The bridge we build must allow us 
To answer the challenge it holds. 
Gertrude Goldman. 

Seniors 
Class Mosts as Voted by the (-iris 

Most popular— Wesley Osborne 
Best looking— Warren Men ill 
Best natured— Joseph Paradis 
(lass sheik—Donald Burnside 
Most studious— Stanford Luce 
Most likely to succeed— Stanford Luce 



Best athlete— Wesley Osborne 

Best dancer— Donald Burnside 

Woman hater— Linwood Sousa 

Best actor— Robert Newcomb 

Done most for class— Stanford Luce 

Class vamp— Mary Skelding 

Biggest bluffer— Robert Newcomb 

Class chatterbox— Barbara Scott 

Class wit— Robert Newcomb 

Class pests— Howard Maybury, Miriam 

Perry 
Most musical— Wesley Osborne 
Class baby— Howard Maybury 

Class Mosts as Voted by the Boys 
Most popular— Bethany Gleason 
Best looking— Bethany Gleason 
Best drag with faculty— Bethan) Gleason 
Best dressed— Bethany Gleason 
Most studious— Gertrude Goldman 
Most likely to succeed— Mar jorie Stod- 
dard 
Best athlete— Virginia Gaudette 
Best dancer— Bethany Gleason 
Man hater— none 
Best actresses— V. Gaudette. M. Skelding 

CLASS HISTORY 
Seniors 

Because the New Norwell High School 
had not been completed in September, 
1936, a group of 31 ambitious young 
people entered Hanover High School. 
beginning four years which proved to be 
very successful. We were Francis Peck- 
ham, Dorothy Ryan, Loring Wadsworth, 
Robert Mott, Warren Merritt, Joseph 
Paradis. Richard Cummings, Stanford 
Luce, Linwood Sousa, Wesle\ Osborne. 
Howard Maybury, Bett\ Mesheau, Don- 
ald Burnside. Man Skelding, Bedlam 
Gleason, Eunice Paige, Gertrude (.old- 
man, Eleanor Bell, Barbara Scott, 
Miriam Perry, Rose Feneck, Shirley 
Porter, Mai jorie Stoddard. Virginia Gau- 
dette, Robert Newcomb, Bettj bond. 
Fred Fair, Francis Paradis. Eugene Dun 
can, Josephine Oicri and Frances lan- 
tillo. 

Although we were' looking forward to 
going into our new building in Septem- 
ber, we were noi too disappointed when 
we found out thai our school was not 
ready. Thai Mai we elected lor our offi- 
cers: Stanford Luce, President; Bethany 
Gleason, Vice-President; Bern bond. 
Secretary; and Betty Mesheau. I reasurer. 

In Max ol the next year we' entered 
Norwell High School, the first (lass to 
have started in as Freshmen and finished 
(he lour years in the new building. 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Nine 



That year proved a successful one for 
our class. We carried off top honors in 
the performance of "Elmer" in the Inter- 
Class plays, putting the upper classes in 
the background and showing our fellow 
classes that the Freshmen could be lead- 
ers as well as followers. 

For our class trip that year we went to 
Fieldston which proved to be a happy 
ending to our first year. 

When we entered school in the fall as 
Sophomores, we found we had lost seven 
of our class members. Fred Fair and Fran- 
cis Paradis had left to go to work. Francis 
is now a valued employee of the Stilphen 
Motors in Dorchester. Francis Peckham 
had found employment in Fall River. 
Josephine Oteri moved back to Boston, 
Dorothy Ryan and Frances Tantillo 
found employment, and Eunice Paige 
moved to Hanover. Betty Bond moved 
to Washington, and she is graduating 
from the Washington, D. G. High School 
this June. 

This year found us excelling again in 
dramatics with the performance of "The 
Pampered Darling" which won second 
prize in the Inter-Class play contest. 

We left the ruling of the class that 
year in the hands of Robert Newcomb, 
President, Loring Wadsworth as Vice- 
President, Secretary Betty Bond until 
she moved to Washington, then Shirley 
Porter took up her duties as Secretary, 
and Treasurer Eugene Duncan. 

When June arrived we took a trip to 
Nantasket, accompanied by Mrs. Dag- 
gett. This proved a pleasant close to our 
second successful year. 

In the fall of 1938 we began our Junior 
year. In looking over our members we 
found that Loring Wadsworth had left 
us. Loring is assistant manager of a flour- 
ishing gasoline station in Braintree; How- 
ard May bury moved to Pembroke. We 
added a valuable new member to out- 
class, James MacDonald from Thayer 
Academy. 

The class officers for that year were 
Robert Newcomb as President, Virginia 
Gaudette as Vice-President, Stanford 
Luce, Secretary, and Eugene Duncan, 
Treasurer. 

Again we demonstrated our outstand- 
ing dramatic ability by winning first 
prize with the fine performance of "The 
Revenge of Shari-Hot Su." 

In May we held our first real class 
dance, the Junior Prom. Everyone ad- 
mitted that the soring decorations were 
most original and the most artistic ever 
arranged in the hall. Because of the date 
conflicting with other Proms of neigh- 
boring towns, its success was social 
rather than financial. 



This year two of our members were 
outstanding in athletics, Eugene Duncan 
was the star pitcher and Wesley Osborne 
was the most outstanding catcher in the 
South Shore League. 

The Junior year closed with a picnic 
at College Pond. Our chaperone, Mrs. 
Turner, said she never had a class that 
gave better eats than we, at this event. 

September again brought us back to 
dear old Norwell High 25 in number, 
because of the fact we gained two new 
faces, Barbara Clark from Washington, 
D. C, and Faustina Longley from Ver- 
mont. Howard Maybury and Eunice 
Paige decided that there was no place 
like Norwell and so returned to our high 
school. 

We were all sorry to hear that Jimmie 
MacDonald was to leave and enter Noble 
& Greenough School. 

We settled down to business electing 
the class officers as follows: Stanford Luce 
as President, Mary Skelding, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Betty Mesheau, Secretary and Wes- 
ley Osborne, Treasurer. 

We were told that we might give a 
dance this year and so in November we 
gave an Autumn Sports Dance which 
proved most original. 

A large majority of our class helped 
Norwell to win the cup against strong 
competition with the presentation of 
"The Kick Oft" in the Tri-Town Plays. 
Among the participants from the Senior 
Class were Mary Skelding, Joseph Para- 
dis, Stanford Luce, Betty Gleason, Shirley 
Porter, Rose Feneck and Robert New- 
comb. 

We are very proud of the long list of 
members of the class who helped Nor- 
well to win some basketball games, in 
the boys' case especially for it had been 
two years since the Norwell boys had 
won a game. Howard Maybury held top 
honors for points scored and you should 
have seen Wes Osborne cover the floor, 
Robert Mott was the most outstanding 
guard in the South Shore League. 

Although the girls did not win the 
championship, they played some vei • 
good games. The team was composed 
mostly of Seniors. 

It was not surprising that the Seniors 
took the cup from the other classes this 
year, with the presentation of "Hung 
Jury." Consider the outstanding dra- 
matic ability of our eless! 

Although the year is not completed, at 
the time of this magazine ,n<>in» to press, 
we feel sure that the commencement ex- 
ercises of the (lass o! 1940 will he most 
outstanding. 

Betty Mesheau '40 



Page Ten 



The Shipbuilder 




Seated: i. to K— G. Goldman, M. Skelding, S. Luce, W. Osberg, E. Mesheau. Standing: 
V. Gaudette, B. Scott, J. Paradis, Miss Hurley, R. Moii. M. Stoddard. 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 



1 he National Honor Society was 
formed in this High School in December, 
1938. The members, taken from the 
Junior and Senior Classes, are pupils 
who have received an average of 85 or 
over in all their work from last Septem- 
ber and who are considered good citizens. 
Meetings are held once a month under 
the direction of our Adviser, Miss Hur- 
ley, and our President, Stanford Luce. 
As far as possible, the members are 
chosen in June for the following year, 
and any others who are eligible (lie next 
fall are entered alter the first marking 
period. 

The members of the National Honor 
Society for 1939-40 are: 

President: Stanford Luce '40 
Vice-President: Willard Osberg '11 
Secretary-Treasurer: Mary Skelding 
'40 
Marjorie Stoddard 
Joseph Paradis 10 
Robert Molt 1(1 
Elizabeth Mesheau 
Gertrude Goldman 
Barbara Scott '40 
Virginia Gaudette 
We all hope that this worth-while or- 
ganization will continue to flourish in 
our school. 

Marjorie Stoddard '40. 



40 



40 
40 

10 



A Gift 

The school recent 1\ received a surprise 
gilt. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson generousl . 
gave X. H. S. many boxes ol various 
types of costumes, to be used 1>\ (he dif- 
fereni classes. The students wish to take 
this opportunity to thank Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilson for their splendid gift. We will 
do our best to keep the costumes in good 
condition so that future classes will also 
enjoy their benefits. 

Leonard Allen Fund 
The Class ol 1938 repeated the play 
"Little Women' - on Mr. Allen's birth- 
day, Feb. 28. A large sum was netted 
from this splendid performance. The 
school's hearty thanks goes to the Class 
of '38, Mr. Booth, and Miss Roe for their 
earnest effort in earning this money for 
books lot Norwell High School. 

The line array ol new books on out 
library shelves is a great tribute to the 
memory ol our greatly loved friend— Mi. 
Allen. 



Mi. Sipple: ".Name ilucc things (hat 
are starch. 

Biology Stuck in : Two culls and a 
collar." 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Eleven 



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 



"What Americanism Means 
to Me" 

When our forefathers signed the Decla- 
ration of Independence, they lit the torch 
of freedom, equity, and justice, that will 
shine for all eternity. 

That torch has been held high, so all 
may see it and be guided by it. 

The beams from this torch have been 
lighting the way for millions of men and 
women for over a century and a half. 

Many of them did not know such free- 
dom existed, until they came to our 
shores. 

When I think of these millions of men 
and women, I often wonder if they are 
overwhelmed by the careless way we crit- 
icize the President's foreign policy or the 
so-called New Deal, the programs we lis- 
ten to on the radio,— the books we read 
and write— and the amount of news in 
our newspapers; for these people never 
dreamed that such "rights" or "priv- 
ileges" could be practiced on this earth. 

We take these "rights" or "privileges" 
as a matter of course. It is not until we 
have actually been in a country where 
the great mass of people are ignorant of 
what is happening in the outside world 
and where a certain few rule the destiny 
of millions, that we know how fortunate 
we are. 

Americanism is like a shining light, an 
inspiring beacon worthy of the sacrifice 
offered by those liberty loving men who 
have been struggling so that this light 
will shine the brighter on the children of 
posterity. 

Our ancestors made that light brighter 
with the fuel of freedom. 

Freedom of thought which enables us 
to secure information from any source 
we please and from anyone we please and 
draw our own conclusions and opinions, 
with due respect for the rights of others. 

Freedom to worship our own God in 
what manner we choose compatible with 
the best interests of our brothers. 

Freedom to write our own observa- 
tions, conclusions, and criticisms so all 
may read them. 

The right to participate in the govern- 
ment and to support whom we think best 
qualified to lead us. 

Equal freedom before the law and trial 
by jury has become the heritage of every 
American. 

It is our duty, as iiue Americans, to 
defend this sacred trust, in memory of 
the men who fought and died to secure it. 
for our own salvation and preservation, 
and for the happiness and security of our 
children. 

Joseph Paradis '40. 



Spring 

Spring, Spring is very near, 

Our feathery friends will soon be here. 

In the Spring the flowers rise 

And open up their sleepy eyes. 

The little creatures come out to play 

While the farmer works in the fields of 
hay. 

The little insects do their best 

Collecting food for the winter's rest. 

The animals come out from their sleep- 
ing place 

And feel the warm sun in their face. 

The butterflies fly from flower to flower, 

Doing their work every hour. 

And that is what the Spring is about, 

That makes everybody sing and shout. 
Arthur Torrey, Grade 8. 

Marquette and Joliet 

Of all the great men we study about I 
think the French Missionaries were the 
greatest. One of these men was Father 
Marquette. This man preached to the 
Indians and the red men grew to love 
him. He settled down between Lake 
Michigan and Lake Huron. Father Mar- 
quette was not satisfied with this life of 
ease. He decided to explore a great river 
with a French fur trader, Louis Joliet. 
These men traveled over wild trails, 
rocky banks, and narrow streams. I ad- 
mire these men because, in spite of the 
difficulties they had, they never gave up. 
Marquette and Joliet had a great deal ol 
courage. 

Joan Dickman, Gr. 5. 

Sponges 

Sponges were first found by a Greek 
diver in the Mediterranean Sea. A sponge 
is the lowest form of animal made up of 
many living cells. The kind of sponge we 
use is the skelton that holds the cells to- 
gether. Some sponges are as tall as a man! 
Sponges come in all sizes, shapes, and 
colors. On the coast of Florida, Greek 
divers are the chief sponge fishermen. 
They used to catch them by dragging 
hooks along the ocean bottom. Now the) 
catch them with modern diving gear. 
The divers carry mesh bags to put the 
sponges in. When the diver goes down 
the water is clear, therefore the only dan- 
ger is from sharks! From May to October, 
the United States government does not 
allow sponge fishing. No sponges can be 
taken unless thc\ are more than five 
inches in diameter. The sponges are pre- 
pared and trimmed with sheep shears. 
The best sponges come from the Mediter- 
ranean Sea where they have been ob- 
tained lor centuries. 

Elmer Goldman, Gr. 5. 



Page Twelve Tll€ SllJpb 

ALUMNI NEWS 

Alter graduation, we, the class of '39, 
realized that we were on our own. The 
problem of trying to find something to do 
confronted us all. Some of us have had 
good luck, while the others are either 
having a hard time or have had difficulty 
in solving the great problem. 

The following is the list of graduates 
of '39 and what they are doing: — 

G. Appleford At home 

R. Apts Burdett Business School 

R. Burns Quincy Trade School 

C. Fcnger Cornell University 

J. Gleason At home 

V. Hall Post graduate 

G. Henderson Working in Norwell 

B. Howes \t home 

A. Joseph Portia Law School 

E. Johnson Clerk at N. H. S. 

]. Litchfield Wilfred Academy 

W. Mesheau Working in Hingham 

L. Newcomb Mass. State College 

D. Page Working in Boston 

E. Pike \l home 

J. Porter At home 

M. Sandberg Professional Model 

|. Sharp Working in Rockland 

H. Shearer Coast Guard 

D. Slade Working in Cambridge 

G. Strachan Air Corps 

R. Torrey Married 

E. White Mass. Radio School 

Edna Johnson '39. 

Social Science 

The Social Studies Department is 
probably one of the most important of 
the school. Much is gained in the discus- 
sions. English is brought into use in "unit 
work," which enables the pupil to under- 
stand the subject and to appl\ it. In this 
type of work each pupil writes a sum- 
mary of the work covered about once 
every month. II he wishes he max include 
pictures, stories, or any other material 
that is related to the current topic. 

The subjects vary according to the 
classes. The juniors and seniors put their 
efforts into studying United States His- 
tory; the freshmen "absorb" information 
about the Clime and Government of the 
United States; the 8th grade studies "The 
Social and Economic Conditions of the 
United Stales," the 7th grade reflects the 
study of "The Economic Geography of 
the United States," and last, hut not 

least, the commercial group oi the two 
upper classes takes up Problems of To- 
day, which is a study of modern prob- 
lems domestic, social, and economic. 



i ikkr 



Many people believe that Social Stud- 
ies are dull, uninteresting suhjects, but 
when they are taken up in this manner— 
when each pupil has the chance to work 
individually— they can be made alive and 
interesting. 

Joseph Farad is '40. 
Gertrude Goldman '40. 

A Day With the Social Studies 

Teacher 

or 

"What's the Use." 

Monday morning! The start ol a new 
week! Mr. Graham glances at his sched- 
ule and a look of horror covers his lace. 
With one quick movement he pushes 
himself into a corner, out of harm's way. 
For, it is the 7th grade Rugg period and 
the "Little Dears" are so anxious to start 
studying the Economic Geography ol 
United States, that the) literally stam- 
pede into the classroom. Once settled, 
Mr. Graham discusses ways in which the 
geography ol the United States is a help 
to industry and commerce, with frequent 
interruptions from the class. 

The next period bring in the 8th grade, 
and a new phase ol Social Studies. Ibis 
time Mr. Graham lectures on the Social 
and Economic Historv ol the United 
States which stalls a discussion ol Amer- 
ica's march toward Democracy. 

A two minute breathing spell and then 
to the Freshmen and the highl) special- 
ized field of crime and government. Ibis 
leads lo a debate as io the cause ol crime 
and a "friendly chat" concerning the 
lime tions of the government. 

Then in troops some ol the problems 
ol today, wait a minute. I mean in comes 
the Problems ol Today c lass; to help Mr. 
Graham spend period lour. The) discuss 
housing and marriage problems. 

Alter 32 minutes of "relaxation." Mr. 
Graham has to lace the expressions ol the 
Juniors. Foi one long period he tries to 
make them understand the HistOH ol the 
United Stales. 

Then, as il sent from heaven ('-) to 
relieve his suffering, the bright and shin- 
ing Seniors lake their places and epiiekh 
absorb an\ information he has io offer on 
I Inked States I listorv. 

Proudly (?) he listens to the 12th 
grade as the) come forth with their inn i 
esting comments. 

2:35, Dismissal, hardl) able to correct 
accumulated papers (we wonder win), 
he ends a typical cla\ in the "school life" 
ol a Social Studies teacher. 

Joseph Paradis 10. 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Thirteen 




Sealed: L to R- H. Lincoln, V. Gaudette, S 
P. Hobson. Standing: J. Liddell, B. Gleason. 

STUDENT 

This June marks the completion of 
three years of the Student Council func- 
tioning in this school. During all this 
time it has tried to build up a worth- 
while reputation and to convey the opin- 
ions and aspirations of the students to 
the proper faculty authority. So far the 
Student Council has functioned quite 
heartily as an organization, giving and 
planning assemblies, dances, and some 
extra curricular activities such as field 
days, etc. 

During the end of last season, a South 
Shore League of Student Councils was 
started, including eight of the neighbor- 
ing towns. This league calls itself the 
South Shore Conference Group, and its 
function is to closely interweave all 
schools in the vicinity. School problems 
are brought up at the meetings. The 
members give suggestions for solving 
these problems. Through this medium, 
school dances and large social events can 
be planned not to coincide with other 
events from another town. 

The Student Council has flourished 
through these, our first three years of 
organization; it will carry on through 
future years for future students of \'or- 
well High School. 

Stan Luce, />. '40. 



Luce, Mr. Thayer, C. Dunbar. W. Osborn, 
R. Sandberg, E. Wadsworth,(R) Fredrickson, R, J) 

COUNCIL 

P. T. A. Gifts 

The Parent Teacher Association was 
again most generous in donating a large 
sum of money to the school. This was 
used in purchasing basketball suits for 
both boys and girls, and other athletic 
equipment. 

There was also a definite sum given 
for hot lunches for deserving students in 
the schools. 

The school wishes to thank the mem- 
bers of the P.T.A. and particularly Mrs. 
John Sparrel who worked so hard as 
chairman of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee in earning this money. 

The Library Committee of the P.T.A. 
under the direction of Mrs. Paul Skel- 
ding presented over a hundred new books 
to the School Library. Every one of these 
books has been greatly in demand and 
still will be in years to come. The pupils 
certainly appreciate this fine collection 
and our sincere thanks goes to Mrs. Skel- 
ding and the P.T.A. Committee. 



Mr. Sipple: "What is a comet?" 
B. Clark: "A star with a tail." 
Mr. Sipple: "Name one." 
B. Clark: "Er— Mickey Mouse." 



Page Fourteen 



The Shipbuilder 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 



Victor Hugo 

Victor Hugo was a very prolific writer 
ol the nineteenth century in France. He 
started early to write and had won a 
French Academy award for one of his 
poems when only seventeen. At twenty- 
two he was a recognized master of the 
lyric. 

When he was thirty, he headed a lit- 
erary revolt from the classics, and found- 
ed the French Romantic school of writers. 
Most of his followers are forgotten, but 
Hugo had such original ideas, command 
of language, splendor of sentiment and 
sense of melody that he triumphed over 
his serious faults of hastiness and ex- 
travagance. Everybody of his time pre- 
dicted that he would burn himself out. 
but his literary output ranged over a 
period of fifty years. He wrote "Les 
Miserables" at the age of sixty, which is 
perhaps his most well known piece. No 
one can doubt that Hugo is a very ver- 
satile writer. 

Episode of Les Miserables 

The false burial of Jean Valjean is 
perhaps the most tense scene in the entire 
book. Jean Valjean had escaped from the 
police by hiding in a convent. There, lie 
found a friend who offered him a means 
ol escape from the convent without de- 
tection. 

Following a death at the convent came 
a burial, but Val jean's friend arranged 
to substitute Valjean in the coffin, and 
thereby remove him from the convent. 
He bribed a grave-digger so that Valjean 
would not actually be buried. 

Then came the escape, and the friend 
learned to his horror that his ally, the 
grave digger, had died, and another al- 
lotted to bury the supposed corpse. He 
was frantic with worry, but saves Valjean 
by an amusing and clever method. 

The grave digger could not siav in 
the cemetery beyond a certain time ol 
night without a ticket— so the friend 
filched his ticket. The grave digger, not 
wishing lo pay a fine, accepted the of- 
fered help of the friend and went home 
Valjean was resc tied. 

Character Descriptions 
Jean Valjean: 

A man who has known too manv hard- 
ships to be able 10 lake advantage o! the 
pleasures of life without long contact 

with them. He slowly becomes a gentle- 
man under the name of Father Made- 
leine, but Javert of the police discovers 
his real name and tries to trac k him clown 



and place him back in jail from where 
he had escaped. The world played 
against him, yet this man died happily 
as his adopted daughter, Cosette. marries 
Marius. 
[avert: 

(avert is pictured as a ruthless "blood- 
hound" type of man. He is the type of 
person who can not allow his duty to be 
altered by humanity and companionship. 
Bishop de Digne: 

A truly generous man. A faithful ex- 
ponent of the Golden Rule, and one who 
can give only right for wrong. 
Cosette: 

"Fhe book does not touch much upon 
her character, but it does show she i-> 
really appreciative of the care that Val- 
jean has shown her. It is her gratefulness 
that makes Valjean die happily. 
Marius: 

Cosette's husband can be characterized 
by the same method as mav be Cosette. 
He was a man who finally showed his 
gratitude to Valjean for all that Valjean 
had done for him and lor his Cosette. At 
one time Marius despises Valjean, not 
knowing that he saved his lib. But later 
he learns about it. and permits Valjean 
to die happily. 

Opinion of the Book 

Personally, 1 believe (hat the book was 
a very interesting one and one abound- 
ing in human interest. I he storv has all 
the elements of a modern storv and it 
displays them all in the proper mood 
and selling. 

Need it be said that I enjoyed the 
book? 

Stanford l.iar, /;. 

Spring Fever 

1 here's something in the Irish spring ail 
Thai lures one- out ol bed and chair. 

It makes the old leel voting again. 

And draws the bear from out his den. 

It calls the children out to plav 

With ropes and balls throughout the clav. 

Young hookworms leave their yellowed 

scrolls 

To come and watch the swill tadpoles, 
boats are rowed by voting and old 
\nd man) tales are gav lv lolel 
About the oar your best friend lost. 
Or what your brother's hip boots cost. 
It makes you hunt new worlds to he' won. 
And leaves the dailv chores undone. 

It makes von want to accomplish a lot. 
And let the things von should do rot. 
Elizabeth lean Haw, Grade 7. 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Fifteen 



Economics 
DO YOU KNOW THAT: 

1. Government testers examining lead- 
ing brands of canned fruit recently, 
found nearly 85% of the cans illegally 
packed and labeled. 

2. In order to administer emergency 
medical treatment to persons injured in 
motor car accidents, the American Red 
Cross now has 2,851 first-aid stations and 
2,626 first-aid motorized highways from 
coast to coast. 

3. Millions of persons and even entire 
races, such as the Eskimo, never care for 
salt added to their food because it is suf- 
ficiently abundant throughout nature to 
satisfy the chemical needs of the body. An 
absolutely salt-free diet if one did exist, 
would prove fatal. 

4. A new typewriter has been invented 
for those who wish to write letters to 
blind persons in Braille. The keyboard 
is standard, but the keys, instead of print- 
ing letters from a ribbon, emboss the 
paper in Braille characters. 

5. The manufacture of explosives is 
so fraught with danger that the workmen 
are not even allowed to wear metal but- 
tons for fear of a chance of a spark. 

6. The longest and costliest errand ofi 
which a telegraph messenger was ever 
sent took place in 1899 when a boy car- 
ried a Western Union telegram from 
Philadelphia to Pretoria. 

7. For every dollar paid to beneficia- 
ries of life-insurance policies in the 
United States, two dollars are paid to 
living policyholders in dividends, ma- 
tured endowments, discontinued policy 
proceeds and annuity, and disability pay- 
ment. 

8. There is no general law that pro- 
vides pensions for the widows of Presi- 
dents of the United States and only ten 
have received them through a special act 
of Congress: Mrs. Abraham Lincoln, 
Mrs. James Garfield, Mrs. James Polk, 
Mrs. John Tyler. Mrs. Ulysses Grant, 
Mrs. William McKinley, Mrs. Theodore 
Roosevelt, Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, Mrs. 
William Taft. 

9. The newest idea in the ice business 
is "sized-ice," or ice cut in seven different 
sizes and wrapped in dripless packages. 

Marjorie Stoddard '40. 

Home Economics 

Home Economics is a subject every 
girl should know. Sooner or later, they'll 
need it in life. Home Economics covers 
a wide field. Besides sewing and cookin«. 



there is the field of health combined with 
real beauty. 

It's very obvious why every girl should 
know how to cook. This knowledge is 
needed even in the highest society. It's 
really a pleasure to cook. Each girl in the 
cooking class has a special duty to per- 
form. Every two weeks, her duties are 
changed. In this way, she has the oppor- 
tunity to learn all the parts of the suc- 
cessful art of cooking. 

Sewing is also as essential as cooking. 
The girls of the sewing class gave a style 
show March 11, for the P.T.A. Grades 
seven to twelve modeled dresses, slacks, 
skirts, and housecoats. 

Once a week, a period is used to dis- 
cuss the way a girl can be attractive; the 
kind of clothing she should wear; and 
about the activities of a healthy girl. It's 
quite complicated to decide what a girl 
should wear. Each girl is a different type 
and she should dress with a mind to that 
effect. 

I feel sure that the girls who have 
taken Home Economics realize the valu- 
able knowledge they have received. Every 
iota of learning received in this class will 
be used to best advantage and will be 
very helpful in later life. 

Margaret Roman '43. 

4-H Club 

The 4-H Club was organized on Octo- 
ber 6. The following persons were elected 
as officers: 

President— Faustina Longley 
Vice-President— Evelyn Ryan 
Treasurer— Helen Frederickson 
There are nine members in the Club 
and the leader, Miss Jenkins. 

On the nineteenth of October the Club 
made up a vegetable and grocer' basket 
which was raffled at a Bridge and Whist 
Party. 

Faustina Longley '40. 

Camera Club 

Well under way, the Camera Club is 
planning a big program to be carried 
through before the end of the vear. In 
March there was an assembly where an 
exhibition of pictures was shown. The 
group expects to take pictures of the dif- 
ferent clubs to show them while actually 
working in their various fields. A Photo- 
graphic Contest is to be held and all tin- 
members hope this will be a big success. 
In collaboration with the Economics De- 
partment, the Science Department is 
making plans to have an experiment 
in soilless planting. 



Page Sixteen 



The Shipbuilder 



C<?merc? Club Cl<'c){<f 




%hi TjW %M 



not HqMb"-*<p?.h%> 




\ ^\ 



Science Department 

The Science Department this year is 
exceedingly fortunate. The school has 
been able to purchase a new microscope 
and a micro-projector. This new equip- 
ment was made by the Spenser Lens Com- 
pany, and the lenses are said to be par- 
ticularly fine. The microscope has the 
power to magnify 100 times and 140 
times. It takes a great deal of time for a 
whole class to observe the actions taking 
place under a microscope. This new 
micro-projector, which projects these 
happenings upon a screen, enables the 
whole class to see what is taking place. 
Microscopic functions are often not re- 
peated so in order to clearly see the 
entire function, this new apparatus is 
most important. A projection lamp is 
also included with the new ecpiipment, 
which facilitates observations whenever 
a strong beam of light is necessary. 

Dr. Tenney Davis, one of Norwell's 
most prominent citizens, has given many 
books and magazines to help increase the 
Scientific Section of our School Library. 
Dr. Davis has also generously given an 
excellent collection of rocks and crystals 
for the school museum, which is rapidly 
increasing. Dr. Davis also has many 
chemicals which he has offered to turn 
over to the school in order to increase the 
equipment to be used in Chemistry ex- 
periments. 

Dr. Davis gave a most interesting as- 
sembly in January connected with Chem- 
istry. His choice of subject dealt mostly 
with explosives. 

The School Museum, to which Dr. 
Davis has so generously contributed, 
needs the help of everyone. If you have 
something to add, the Science Depart- 
ment will appreciate your contribution 
toward expanding its collection. 

Barbara Clark '40. 

LAUGHS 
JOKES 

"You can take it as an elementary con- 
ception that when an article is sold, ii 
goes lo (he buyer," said Mr. Thayer in 
the economics class. 

"With the exception of coal." chirped 
the bright senior, Donald Burnside. 

"And win coal?" asked Mr. Thayer. 

"When that's bought, it goes to the 
((liar." 

B. Gleason. "So you finally heard from 
that college boy who took you out?" 

M. Skelding: "Yes, and he's a real gent, 
he is. He asked me if I gol home from 
the dance he took me to all right." 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Seventeen 



W. Merritt: "Speaking about baseball, 
I've got a baseball dog." 

W. Osborne: "What makes you call 
him a baseball dog?" 

W. Merritt: "Because he wears a muz- 
zle, catches flies, chases fowls, and beats 
it for home when he sees the catcher com- 
ing." 

Mr. Johnston had been instructing the 
eighth grade children to say "double" 
whenever two of the same letter appeared 
together in a word. One day the class 
came to this sentence in their English 
book. "Up, up and see the sun rise." M. 
Simpson read: "Double up, and see the 
sun rise." 



lipstick 



F. Shaw: "Have you seen my 
anywhere? I've evidently lost it.' 

C. Joseph (scanning her critically) : 
"Why, darling, you have it on." 

"Well, my boy," said R. Newcomb's 
Uncle, "and how are you getting on at 
school?" 

Robert looked a trifle despondent. 

"Oh, not so bad, Uncle," he replied; 
"and I'm trying awfully hard to get 
ahead." 

"That's good," said Uncle, absent- 
mindedly, "you need one." 

Mr. Page: "Are you going to take the 
car out in this rainstorm?" 

B. Page: "Certainly. It's a driving rain, 
isn't it?" 

Two seniors yawned and R. Cummings 
said, "What shall we do to-night?" 

"Let's toss up a coin to decide," replied 
R. Mott. 

"If it's heads, we'll go to the movies: 
if it's tails, we'll call on Ann and Beth- 
any; and it it stands on end. we'll study." 

E. Smith: "What woidd you like best 
in a husband— brains, ambition, or ap- 
pearance?" 

E. Paige: "Appearance, and I wish he'd 
hurry up." 

Here's a Clean One: — 
"May I hold your Palm-olive?" 
"Not on your Lile-Buov." 
"Then I'm out of Lux." 
"Yes, [vory formed." 

We think Mr. Johnston should have 
this motto for his car: "This is not oppor- 
tunity—opportunity knocks but once." 

H. Maybury: "What time is it?" 
M. Osborne: "It's late. Chubby, you'd 
better get started.'' 
H. Maybury; "All right, turn out the 

lights." 



Page Eighteen 



The Shipbuilder 



'40 FOIBLES 



P 






CTj' 



5+ud^ Kail on 










7^.« 



The /^?3 d^»K *•* lv*4is« 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Nineteen 




Seated: L to R— P. Hobson, B. Gleason, E. Wadsworth, B. Scott, V. Gaudette M. Osborne, E. Mesheau, 
V. Scott, B. Cummings. Standing: Miss Harris, A. Pike, J. Strachan, M. Skelding, J. Liddell, J. 
Dowd, N. Cummings, M. Roman, M. Mott. 

GIRLS' SPORTS 



Field hockey and basketball were the 
main sports played by the Norwell girls 
this year. 

Field Hockey 

A field hockey team was formed which 
consisted mostly of Freshmen. Two 
games were played, one with Hanover, 
the other with Pembroke, the scores be- 
ing Hanover 12, Norwell 1, the other 
Pembroke 2, Norwell 1. 

At least six games are scheduled to be 
played next year. 

Basketball 

The girls had a good basketball team 
this year, even though they did lose a 
number of players at graduation last 
year. Several new ones were gained, how- 
ever, from the Freshmen class and many 
exciting games were played, the most 
notable being with Hanover and Scituate. 
The Scituate game was postponed to 
March 15 because of the storm. The re- 
sults were as follows: 





N 





N 


O 


W. Bridgewater 


24 


16 


1!) 


21 


Kingston 


26 


25 


18 


29 


Pembroke 


20 


9 


20 


20 


Marshfield 


1 1 


.H6 


16 


16 


Scituate 


19 


25 


14 


8 


Avon 


25 


30 


26 


32 


Duxburv 


6 


17 


10 


.38 


Hanover 


15 


21 


9 


50 



The players were: Forwards: Barbara 
Scott, Bethany Gleason, Betty Mesheau, 
Norma Cummings, Virginia Gaudette, 
Marie Mott, Anna Pike and Ellen Skel- 
ding. 

The Guards were: Elizabeth Wads- 
worth, Virginia Scott, Mary Osborn, Bar- 
bara Clark, Penelope Hobson, Barbara 
Cummings, Jane Liddell, Jeanette 
Strachan and Margaret Roman. 

Letters were awarded to the following: 
B. Gleason, V. Gaudette, B. Mesheau, 
B. Scott, V. Scott, E. Wadsworth, M. 
Osborn. 



R. Newcomb: 'Til give you five dol- 
lars if )ou'll let me paint you." 

W. Osborne shifting his tobacco from 
one cheek to the other and back again. 

R. Newcomb: "It's easy money." 

Osborne: "That hain't no question 
bout thct," Osborne replied. "I was jes' 
a-wonderin' how I'd get the paint off 
afterwards!" 



S. Porter, eloping: "Daddy is going to 
be completely unstrung." 

\V. Met riit: "That's all right, dearest; 
we'll wire him at once." 



Page Twenty 



The Shipbuilder 




Seated: L to R— Paige, I uinrr, Osborn, Maybury, Mott, Paradis, Burnside, Paradis, 
Dyer. Standing: Mr. Sipple, Maybury, I.ilev, Luce, (.onion. Osberg, Beck. Hayes 

Mr. Graham. 



BASKETBALL 



Although Norwell had a rather poor 
season in basket hall this year, it was 
somewhat of an improvement over last 
\ear. The team was composed mostly ol 
seniors, with a fine second team of under- 
classmen, who show promise of outstand- 
ing ability in future years. The forward 
line ol the team was: Howard Maybury, 
Paul Paradis. Donald Burnside, Francis 
Dyer, Robert Maybury. Bill Turner and 
Wesley Osborne. For guards we had Rob- 
ert Mott, who was captain of the team, 
Robert Page, Joseph Paradis, and An- 
drew Gordon. 

The scores were as follows: 







N 


() 


N 


() 


Duxbury 




6 


Hi 


21 


37 


W. Bridgewater 


14 


38 


15 


35 


Kingston 




23 


31 


19 


20 


Pembroke 




If) 


25 


24 


31 


Marshfield 




17 


23 


21 


26 


Scituate 




21 


18 


27 


25 


Avon 




li) 


13 


31 


23 


Hanover 




17 


25 


10 


21 




Baseball 







As the basketball season is completed, 
baseball will be the next activity. The 
coming of a new coach, Mr. Graham. 



who promises to take a real interest in 
the team, assures Norwell ol winning 
their share ol games. About twenty boys 
have reported lor practice, many of them 
new players. 

The enthusiasm ol the newcomers bol- 
stered b\ the experienced veterans prom- 
ises Norwell a fine team. 

Wesley Osborne '40. 



C. Dunbar: "Rodney, do you evei 
shave?" 

R. Demars: "Sure, I shave religiously." 

C. Dunbar: "Whaddaya mean, relig- 
iously?" 

R. Demars: "Every Sunday." 

[. Paradis: "How did you rale Flossie 
Shaw for that last dance?" 

I). Burnside: "I made the word Ford' 
sound like Cord* over the telephone." 

1). Henderson: "Where have you been, 
Bob?" 

B. Ken yon: "In tin phone booth talk 
ing to my girl. but. darn it, someone 
wanted to use the phone and we had to 
"C't out." 



ThC Shipbuilder Page Twenty-one 

SCHOOL NEWS 

Inter-Class Plays Common Observances in the 

Every year the student body eagerly Commercial Room 
looks forward to the Inter-Class Play con- 
test and this year's production surely Cummings and Merrut hiding behind 
lived up to our expectations. Each play the desk tops when Mrs. Turner has out- 
was exceptionally well done but the sen- sitle work to be done, 
iors carried off the honors with their Shirley Porter and Rose Feneck always 
thriller "Hung Jury." Each role in this talking over their affairs, 
performance was the characterization of Robert Mott seldom using an eraser, 
a particular type of human in our Amer- Marjone Stoddard acting the part of 
ican civilization. These roles were truly the business woman. 

portrayed by the members of the class The freshmen girls casting longing 

as follows - glances at "Chubby" Maybury. 

Hung Jury Cast Francis Dyer suppressing curses at ink 

Henry Mergue ...... .Robert Newcomb blots. 

Mary Prentiss Virginia Gaudette Warren Liley and John Beck strug- 

Boland Joseph Paradis g lin g to turn their cryptics into English 

Tom McLean Donald Burnside writing. 

Greta Pinkley Eleanor Bell Stanford Luce piling up another speech 

Parnell Howard Maybury record in typing. 

Fischer Stanford Luce George Sargent and Francis Dyer say- 

Dembrowski Richard Cummings ,n g " l ha te you" (they audit another 

Miss Jenny Elizabeth Mesheau book) . 

Mrs. Fernald Barbara Clark Class 10 always yelling for a speed test 

Miss Jones Shirley Porter (they think they're some punkins in typ- 

Mrs. Potti Gertrude Goldman in g) • 

Director Mr. Johnston The g irls with fresh manicures duck- 

Asst. Director Mary Skelding in g ditto work. 

Prompter Bethany Gleason Eleanor Bell and Shirley Butler gig- 

Stage Manager Wesley Osborne g nn g- 

The Juniors presented "To the Vic- Kenneth Gauley and Rodnev Demars 

tor," a most delightful comedv. Each sa y in g how they love shorthand, 

person in this cast was outstanding in his Ev,e Johnson, Charlotte Dunbar and 

portrayal of the youth of today. " Ruth Morey trying to gain one more 

The Sophomores gave a costume fan- P oint in shorthand, 
tasy "Crinoline and Candlelight." A Flossie Shaw and Connie Joseph corn- 
lovely part of this play was the dancing paring dates, 
of the minuet by candlelight. Miriam Perry singing "My Heart Be- 

For the first year, a cup was presented ' on g to Harry, 

to the winning class. The cup was given Robert Kenyon likes olives, 
to the school by Mrs. H. D. Atwater. This 
cup will be inscribed each year with the 
name of the class who wins. 

The Dinghy Commercial Department 

Our school paper was a little late in The following people have won a cer- 

getting organized this year, for the first tificate from the Gregg Publishing Co. 

issue did not appear until April. It was for their ability to take dictation at 60 

decided that the price of the periodical words a minute— M. Stoddard, S Porter, 

be lowered to two cents, and that it be B. Feneck, H. Maybury, R. Mott. V. Hall, 

made a bi-weekly publication. Marjorie Stoddard, S. Porter and R. 

The staff is as follows: Feneck have also won the 80 word certifi- 

Editor-in-Chief G. Goldman cate. It is hoped that many more will win 

Asst. Editors W. Osberg, B. Clark this certificate before June. 

Art Editor M. Skelding In typing tests of 5 minute duration. 

Sports V. Gaudette, R. Cummings Shirley Porter averages 72 words a mir- 

Social Editors B. Gleason, R. Sandberg ute with one error in the whole test, 

The cooperation of the staff, and the Howard Maybury averages 67 words with 

many contributions which were made. errors, Weslev Osborne 66 words with 

helped to make the first issue a grand 2 errors and Linwood Sousa 01 words 

success. with errors. 



Page Twenty-two 



Itn Shipbuilder 




:::::::::: 






•••■■••■•••■•••••••a* 



■••*•»•••••■■■••• 



Fi,,h/ Row: I'. Shaw. R. Feneck, S. Luce, M. Skelding, B. Gleason. Sac* Row: 1). Burnsid?, 
J. Paradis, S. Porter, E. Anderson, H. Young, Mr. Johnston. 1). Henderson. W. Osberg. 



NORWELL WINS CUP! 

For the second year Norwell High has won the cup in the Tri-Town Play contest. 
This year's winner was "The Kick-OH" coached In Mr. Johnston. Marshfield High 
presented "The Devil and Daniel Webster" and Scituate High "The Lord's Prayer." 
All three plays were done exceptionally well. 

At the close of the plays the three casts were the guests of Marshfield High School 
at a delicious banquet and dancing party in Marshfield's new high school. Everyone 
had a grand time. The seniors regret that tins is their last chance to compete with these 
schools. 

The Kick-Ofl Cast 

Red Field Joseph Paradis 

Jean Ferris Marv Skelding 

Mrs. A. Pugliano Rose Fence k 

Mrs. Roland Chahnors III Florence Shaw 

Professor Mollins Willard Osberg 

Fred Parke Robert Xewcomb 

Teacher Shirley Point 

Petunia Bethany Gleason 

Professor fudson Stanford Luce 

Director .' Ml Johnston 

Stage Manager Donald Bin nside 

Ass't Manager Barbara Clark 

Scenery Richard Henderson. Harold Young 

Properties Elizabeth Mesheau 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Twenty-three 



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Page Twenty -four 



Opening a Sarcophagus 

Crash! Bang! Another, the last, one ol 
the huge stones that blocked the door- 
way of the ancient Egyptian sarcophagus 
had fallen away. The sweating Egyptian 
slaves gasped as they sent startled gazes 
down the steps that led where? 

I grabbed my flashlight and started 
running down the stone steps. "Wait, 
wait, Master," my guide shouted as be- 
came running up. Then I remembered 
his telling me that when a tomb had 
been shut up a long time poisonous gases 
often filled it. So, regretfully I walked 
back up the stone steps to wait until the 
tomb could air itself out. 

About five minutes later 1 started 
again, slowly this time and with a torch. 
My guide and I went down hundreds of 
steps and walked through endless halls 
until at last we came to a huge stone 
Hoor in the center of the tomb. When I 
opened it I stopped short. I couldn't 
take another step. The walls of this 
room, instead of being made of old gray 
tumbling stones as the others had been, 
were of solid gold. 

The Hoor was terraced upwards to a 
platform in the middle. The outer ter- 
race was of bronze. The next of beauti- 
ful gold. The next was silver, which was 
very precious to the ancient Egyptians. 
The platform itself was of amber studded 
with mounted rubies and emeralds. The 
companies that had sponsored the exca- 
vating would not be disappointed as I 
had feared at first, they would be pleased, 
very pleased. I had opened a new treasure 
house for the world. 

Constance Baily, Gr. 6. 
A Walk 

One day when 1 went walking in the 
woods, I saw a rabbit. The rabbit stood 
so still in the bushes that I didn't see him 
at first. Then I saw the white on his tail. 
Then I knew it was a rabbit. When I 
went away I looked back and just saw the 
rabbit go into his hole. 

Farther down the path along the bank 
of the river I saw a beaver. The beavei 
was making a house. I went up closer to 
him. The beaver saw me and went into 
his hole. I went farther down the river 
and saw more beavers' homes. I had a 
good time. 

Lila Mollins, Gr. 4. 
Going Fishing 

One day my brother was going fishing. 
I wanted to go because 1 had never been 
fishing. He said I would fall in or gel 
my fish hook (aught in something. He 
finally let me go. 

When we got there he was the one that 
got his line caught. He fell in, not I. 
Grace Sargent, Gr. 4. 



The Shipbuilder 



The Fairy by the Brook 

Betty and Bob jumped out of bed on 
the first day of May. They quickly got 
their clothes and ran down to breakfast. 

At the breakfast table mother said, 
"Children, will you go out into the field 
after breakfast, and get me some flowers?" 

"Oh, yes," both Betty and Bob cried. 

After breakfast Betty and Bob went to 
the field with their baskets. When they 
were in the field they heard some soft 
pretty music by the brook. Bettv decided 
to see what it was, but Bob didn't 
think it was very much. While Bob was 
waiting for Betty to come back, Betty 
had seen something in the brook. She 
looked more carefully and found two 
little shoes. Then she saw it was a little 
fairy. "My name is Bluebell," said the 
fairy, "and 1 live in this brook." Then 
she disappeared. Betty went back to Bob 
and told him what she saw. Every day 
after that Bettv and Bob went to visit 
Bluebell. 

Barbara Blake, Gr. 4. 

A Summer Hike 

The first day of summer was a warm 
day. The sun was shining bright l\ and 
the sky was blue with white clouds. I 
decided to go on a hike. 

After I had gone about one mile, I 
came to a prett) little brook. Beside the 
brook were some lovely green trees. I sat 
there and ate my lunch. Then 1 went 
home. I enjoyed my hike. 

' Mildred Osborne. Gr. -f . 

A Winter Day 

All through the night snow was fall- 
ing fast. In* the morning everything 
sparkled like silver. The outdoor world 
was covered with snow. The trees hung 
low with snow on the branches. All 
through the day everyone was happy. 
John Marsh, dr. 4. 
A Beautiful Memory 

I will never forge! one evening last 
winter about twilight. I was returning 
from Northfield, Massachusetts. 1 he set- 
ting sun cast pretty colors on the icicles. 
When we got to Barre, ii was dark 
enough to see the full moon as it rose 
from behind the hill. It was such a prett) 
scene one would think it was a picture. 
John Osborn, (ir. 5. 

Rubber 

Down in the warm countries there are 
rubber trees. The men go out and cut a 
hole in the trees. Then they pul a buckel 
under the holes. The milk\ rubber runs 
into the bucket. To keep the rubber they 
put a shovel in the hue kei and then pul 
tne shovel over the Inc. The sip hardens 
on the shovel and this keeps it. 

Robert Wessman, Gr. 4. 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Twenty-five 




CLASS 7 
First Row. L to R— Loring, Cumniings. Osborne, Higgins, Henderson. Eastman, Ryan, 
Murphy, Liddell, Ross, Jackman, Desjardin. Second Row. Ewart, Prouty, Cornwell, 
Bennett, Bennett, Gauley, Snowdale, Piont. Liley, Gauley, Pike, Osborne. Last Row: 
Mayhew, Geougetti, Maybury, Mollins, Bennett, Kelly, McLeod, Henderson, Lawrence, 

Monti, Kelly. 



Fall Dresses 

1 he trees of my pine lot are dressed in 
their best gowns, show women fashions 
of fall. 

Mother nature, the best dress designer 
of the wide world, designs them. 

The maples are dressed in their finest 
gold. 

The oaks make the fire bend its head 
in shame because it can't match their 
llaming red. 

The chestnuts in their browns show 
their evening colors. The ladies envy 
them. 

But not for long do these trees stay 
cheerful. They stand there still and bare 
a few weeks later. 

The evergreens make fun of them. 
They do not feel low. 

John Albert, Gr. 6. 

I ake the legs from any table, 
Take the arms from any chair, 
From a pillow take the torso. 
And from a paint brush lake the hair: 
And I'll bet before I'm through, 
I'll get more loving from this dummy 
Than I ever got from you. 



Mexico's Floating Gardens 

Mexico has many "Floating Gardens." 
They were first made by the Aztecs of 
long ago. Rafts were made and on them 
the Aztecs put rich soil. They planted 
flowers and vegetables on this soil. These 
gardens can be taken from place to place. 
Poles are used to fasten them in one 
place. Roots have grown on some of the 
poles, therefore sometimes they cannot 
be moved from place to place. 

Jacqueline Felini, Gr. 5. 

Autumn Leaves 

They are so delicate 

And so gorgeous 

With many colors. 

They are red. 

They are scarlet. 

They are dull red. 

They are purple, too. 

They flutter up and down 

And swing and sway from branches of 

trees, 
And poets get new ideas. 
They help make the landscape 
And make things show up belter. 

George Wyman, Gr. 6. 



Page Twenty-six 



The Shipbuilder 




CLASS 8 

Seated: I. to R— Mesheau, Hart, Brewster, Ekstrom, Makowski, Fouler. Arvidson, 

Simpson, Fenck. Cole, Lincoln, Ferguson. Standing: Smith, Luce, Broughton, Hunt, 

Brooks, Cruff, Higgins, Smith, Lambert, Norris, Torrey, Perry. 




CLASS 9 

First How: I. to R— Cummings, Hobson, May hew, Ewart, Hayes, Mott, Walters, Kelly, 

Brown, Pike, Holcomb. Second Row: Butler, Morey, Hall, Liddell, Osborn, Stansfield, 

Liley, Osborn, Henderson, Roman. Last How: Mesheau, Bernard, Bennett, Cummings, 

II. ill. Stoddard, Wvman, Merritt. 



The Shipbuilder 



Page Twenty-seven 




CLASS 10 
First Row: L to R— Fredrickson. Wadsworth, Strachan, Howes, Dyer, Fredrickson, Hard- 
wick, Bates. Fredrickson, Lawrence, McManus. Second Row: Brewster, Paradis, Liley, 
Sargent, Gordon, Hamblin, Page, Turner, Beck. Last Row: Page, Makowski, Ryan, May- 
bury, Ross, Adams, Burnside, Slade. 




CLASS 11 

Seated: L t<> R— Morey, Mohler, Dunbar, Shaw. Osberg, Scott, Anderson, Dowd. Joseph. 

Standing: Noting, Torrey, Kenyon, Henderson, Sandberg, Gauley, Dcmars. 



...AUTOGRAPHS... 




-, . 






*v 0- 




PLASTIC BINDING U. S. PATENT NO. 1970285 THOMAS ORCGM & CO 



Warren K. Vantine 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Official Photographer 
For The Shipbuilder 
Class of 1940 



160 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 
Hancock 0743 - 0744 



CEDAR SPRING DAIRY 



r <z^=^ 




Local Milk from a State and Federal 
Accredited Herd. 



. . . Compliments of 



George Beach 



PLUMBING and HEATING 



Central Street Norwell, Mass. 

Telephone Norwell 41 



HAT'S 


ELRRELE& DELCRY 


RADIO LAC. 


For 


Matthew S. Ajeman, Prop. 


Everything in Graduation 


SALES and SERVICE 


and Class Day Footwear 


343 UNION STREET 


Featuring Gordon Hosiery 
and 


ROCKLAND, MASS. 


The New Wedgies for Sports 


Latest popular and classical 


* 


recordings 




Radio repaired and serviced 


UNION ST. ROCKLAND 
Opp. Webster St. 


DON'T SUFFER . . . 




. . on the Grand March 


. . Compliments of . . 


A Ifa 


A FRIEND 


mi iUl 


4- * •*• 


nrFooMCD acmes Due to misfit smccs 


BE CORRECTLY FITTED TO 


+ 


YOUR CLASS DAY SHOES 




THEY COST NO MORE 


* 


LE Ly VELDS 


* 


ROCKLAND 





. . . COMPLIMENTS OF . . . 

HOMESTEAD 
FARM 



Ncriuell 



Mass. 



Telephone Rockland 1095-W 

DONALD r. RCDDINS CC. 

SALE & SERVICE 
325 Union Street, Rockland, Mass. 



Electric Ranges 
and Refrigerators 
Bendix Home Laundry 



Scccny Range end Fuel Oil 
Automatic Heating Systems 
Air Conditioning 



Brockton Business 
College 

OFFERS 

ADVANCED TRAINING 
FOR BUSINESS 

One and Two Year Courses pre- 
pare the individual student toh roughly, 
rapidly, and inexpensively for a 
productive place and promotion in 
the business world. - For latest 
bulletins address, George E.Bigelow, 
Principal, 226 Main Street, Brockton, 
or call at our College office. 

Our graduates are in demand 
There's a reason. 

Founded 1892 


Howard A. 
Delano 

CONTRACTOR AND 
BUILDER 

Specializing in 
Colonial Houses 

Main Street 
NORWELL, MASS. 


TCLMANS 

-: Poultry Farm :- 


. Compliments of . 

American Legion 
Auxiliary, Post 192 


BABY CHICKS 

o 

HATCHING 
EGGS 


ROCKLAND R. F. D. 
Tel. Han. 94-2 



Massachusetts 




Merchandise Service 




38 Newbury St., Boston 


We want you to think of Ranney's 
when you think of clothes for 


Tel. Com. 3520 


any occasion. Quality and style 


Pay CASH and SAVE MONEY on 


at a Moderate price is the goal 
for which we constantly strive. 


Furniture 




Bedding 

Chintz and fabrics 


Special prices for graduation 


Household equipment 


RANNEY'S 


Auto accessories 


Quality Men's wear 


Seeds 




EVERYTHING but food and clothes 






Next to Trust Co. . . . ROCKLAND 


Call : R. D. McMullan 




Telephone Norwell 177 






BELIES MRM 




Fresh killed Poultry 




Fruits, Vegetables, Eggs 


. . Compliments of . . 


"From Farm To You" 




Washington St., Norwell 




Telephone 121-M-4 


Dr. William I . Parsons 




Cape Film Service 




Motion Pictures for Churches 


%,# 


Homes, Clubs, Schools 
All types of Programs 




Sound and Silent 




All equipment Furnished 




Albert Goldman 




Class of "36" 


_ 


Box 14 ROCKLAND, MASS. 




A Mutual Savings Bank 

For Over 

One Hundred Years 



Dividends have been pa id 
without interruption throughout 
the entire history of the bank, 
the total amount distributed to 
depositors being in excess of 
$2,500,000.00 



South Scituate Savings Bank 

N O R W E L L 



■> 



COMPLIMENTS OF . . 



HERBERT E. BOBBINS 



I N S I I X N < I 



* 



NORWELL, MASS. 



THE 



Oparrell funeral Service 



Est. 1820 
ERNEST H. SPARRELL 




FUNERAL CHAPEL FUNERAL HOME 

Central St., Norwell So. Main St., Cohasset 

Tel. 2 Tel. 0200 



BEST WISHES 

To The 

SENIOR CLASS 

from 



Ladies Fire Auxiliary 
Ccmb. 1 



Whist Parties at Engine House 
second Tuesday of each month 



COUNTRY 
TARE 

GOOD EATING 
NOON TO NINE 



QUEEN ANNE CORNER 

HINGHAM 
Tel. 1002 



INTERIOR DECORATING 
and UPHOLSTERING 



fr€d R. 

Uurnsidc 

OC10I)CX1CXO)0 

Smith Place 

COHASSET, MASS. 

Telephones : 

Cohasset 0239 
Norwell 121-M2 



Irving I . Henderson 

-: The Convenient Store :- 

Main Street 

Telephone Norwell 168 



We sell the following Products: 
Crosse and Blackwell 
Heinz Soups 
Swift's Premium Products 
AND 
A complete line of groceries 



LOOKING FOR A DIGNIFIED VOCATION ? 

STUDY BEAUTY CULTURE .... 

.... In it's Most Advanced Form 

We prepare young men and women for a 
life of refinement . . . interesting work . . . 
security and prosperity. Courses are complete 
and systematized, with sound proven prin- 
ciples correctly applied. Our Instructors have 
been carefully prepared to a required standard, 
and each one is a Graduate of the Academy 
itself. This feature insures capable presenta- 
tion of all subjects which are essential in any 
professional training center. — Classrooms are 
spacious and modernly equipped ... an en- 
tire building is devoted for this purpose. — 
The number of high-class positions filled by 
our Free Placement Bureau has increased 
yearly for more than a decade, assuring un- 
deniable success to our graduates. 

MODERATE TUITION . . . CONVENIENT PAYMENT TERMS 
DAY AND EVENING CLASS 

Further information regarding your own possibilities in this vocation gladly furnisht d. 

Write for free booklet — or visit our Academy without obligation. 

WILFRED ACADEMY 

of HAIR AND BEAUTY CULTURE 
492 Boylston Street Boston, Mass. KENmore 0880 




. . Compliments of . . 

W. T. GRANT CO, 



Your friendly department 
store. Our girls are thor- 
oughly experienced,having 
been employed in your 
GRANT store from eight to 
thirteen years 



263 Union St., ROCKLAND, MASS. 



Call's Drug Co, 

SCITUATE 

Prescriptions a Specialty 



Call's Home Made Ice Cream 
Made Fresh Daily on the Premises 

. . CALL LP CALL . . 

Phone Scituate 1000 



BEST WISHES TO YOU 

40's 

FROM 

Gccrgc N. Eteal 

AND 

Chevrolet 



THE Villi I 

CULVER COMPANY 



DEALERS IN 

Grain, Coal, Ice, Flour, 

Hay and Straw, Lime and 

Cement 

Poultry Supplies, Fertilizers 

Grass Seeds 

Fuel and Range Oil 

Silent Glow Oil Burners 

Frigidaire 

175 UNION, ST., ROCKLAND 
Tel. Rockland 50 



THE 

STONE HOUSE 

GARDENS 

FLORIST 




DESIGNS, PLANTS 
AND CUT FLOWERS 

MAIN STREET NORWELL 

N. MOLLA, Prop. 



Quality?. . . 



We Invite Your Close 
Inspection of the Print- 
ing of this Year Book. 



a 



the CELLAR PRINT 

Main Street Tel. Nor. 112-J 
NO R W E L L 



KIX X=XX=KX=»OC» X=> 


HARRY E. ROME 


Compliments of 


Furniture Store 


R€$C r LCL 


# 




GENERAL ELECTRIC 




REFRIGERATORS 


303 Union Street 


^ 


ROCKLAND, MASS. 






Phone 164 


ooooooooooo* 


344 Union St. . . Rockland 


CAPEWAY SERVICE 
STATION 


Rome Brothers 

278 UNION ST., ROCKLAND 

DISPLAY SALE OF 


BLUE SUNOCO GAS 


OIL STOVES 


TIRES and ACCESSORIES 


ANOTHER FACTORY WARE- 




HOUSE PURCHASE ENABLES 


J- 


US TO SELL OIL STOVES OF 




AMAZING SAVINGS. 


Junctions of routes 128 and 3 
R. C. PIKE, Mgr. 


Many Styles 2 to 6 Burner 
See these before you buy 



JCHNS.NTTS 


C lilt I P. rAH \l 

Dealer In Live and Dressed 


•*• 


POULTRY 


Dealer in 


Prices always fair and consistent 


Grain, Coal, Coke, Wood, 


May We Serve you? 


Cement, Range and 


4 


Furnace Oil 






Resident 


* 


HIGH ST. NORWELL 


Phone Rock. 1295 




P. O. Address 


GREENBUSH, MASS. 


R. F. D., ROCKLAND, MASS. 


Telephone Scituale 285-W 





COAL 



COKE 



WOOD 



L 
U 
M 
B 
E 
R 



S 
A 
S 
H 



D 
O 
O 
R 
S 



LOWE BROS. PAINTS 

WASHABLE WALL PAPER 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

Armstrong's Linoleum and Rugs 

Bendix Washing Machines 



THE WELCH COMPANY, INC. 

SCITUATE HARBOR, MASS. 



H 
A 
R 
D 
W 
A 
R 
E 



F 
U 
R 
N 
I 
T 
U 
R 
E 



FARMING TOOLS 



SEEDS 



FERTILIZERS 



. . Compliments of . . 

McMANUS 
BOX f ACTOPY 


Compliments of 

Whitman C. 
SCULE 

NORWELL, MASS. 

Am 


BUSHEL BOXES 
. . SLAB WOOD . . 


Tel. Rockland 343-R 


CHESLEVS 

239 UNION ST., ROCKLAND 

MISSES AND WOMEN'S 

Ready to Wear 

DRESSES - SKIRTS - BLOUSES 

UNDIES - HOSIERY 

Bags - Jewelry - Handkerchiefs 

Bathing Suits - Play Togs 

Novelty Linens - Towels 

Kiddie Clothes 


Compliments of . . . 

HOWARD W. PRATT 

NORTH HANOVER, 
MASS. 


ROCKLAND 
SHOE HOSPITAL 

HIGH CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Our Motto is Courtesy 

and Service 

341 UNION ST. ROCKLAND 



APT & Mil 


COMPLIMENTS 


SHOPPE 


OF 


Yarns A Specialty 


PERRY 


ft 


CSBCRN 


20 Miles From Boston 




20 Miles from Plymouth 


4 


ACCORD, MASS. 




MRS. J. E. WHEELER 




Tel. Rock. 829-M1 


Norwell, Mass. 


Route 3 




SARGENT'S 


JACOBS 
POULTRY 


cf Assinippi 


fAPM 


Open Until One A. M. 


Barred Rock Baby Chicks 

Hatching Eggs and Breeding Stock 


SANDWICHES 




CHICKEN PIES 


* 


WAFFLES 




SODAS and SUNDAES 






WILLIAM D. JACOBS 


OPEN ON MONDAY 


ASSINIPPI, MASS. 




HIGGINS 

Commercial 
Machine School 

A Good Salary Se- 
cured by girls com- 
pleting courses on 
Comptometers,Monroes,Sundstrands, 
Electric Elliott-Fishers, Dictaphones, 
International All Electric Typewrit- 
ing Machines, Burroughs Electric 
Calculator; tuition payable in six 
months or when working. Day and 
Eve. 28thyr.Free placement Service. 



234 Boylston St. 



Ken 7696 



KILTS 



MEN'S SHOP 

Harberdashery Work Clothes 

6>fO 

245 Union St., Rockland 

Complete line of Pants for all 
occasions. 

"HEADQUARTERS for ADAM HATS" 



MYRTLE fARM 

LUNCHEON and DINNERS 

Route 123 MAIN STREET, NORWELL Tel. Nor. 126 

Bridge and Special Parties 

CATHERINE V. PARADIS 

CLOSED MONDAYS 

Orders taken for Fancy Cakes and Tea Sandwiches Bread and Pies 



NEVER AGAIN* 



.-/r///.- 



He jumped too quick — bought tires before he'd 
found out about the sensational mileage and 
featherbed ride of the new Pennsylania RX. Let 
that b^ a warning to you — see the RX first! 



ESTES AEITC 
SUPPEY 

UNION ST. 
ROCKLAND 

Tel. 1545 



SATLIT PLAYHOUSE 



SCITUATE HARBOR 



"THE THEATRE UNIQUE" 




I 



Where Particular People Come 
From Miles Around 



Ccngratulaticns 
cnajcb u< IIcImh ... 




Now you are going to take your place in the business world. There 
was a time when you could almost always tell which man was the 
clerk and which was the executive by the clothes he wore. Not any 
more, though . . . Remick's fine styling and tailoring enables even 
the clerk at the bottom rung of the business ladder to achieve that 
smart evecutive look. May I help you with your outfit, coon? 

Herman Keay 

School Representive 

THE I I >4H I CC. QUINCY 



Pickles 


Why Waste your Gas? 


Young's 


Why Not Save Time? 


Bowling 


YOU CAN 
Get what You Need from the 


Alloys • 


Traveling Five and Dime 


BOWL for Health . . . 


Drop us a card, we will stop at 
your door. We have two trucks, 


. . . and Pleasure 


that serve the South Shore. 


New Stream Line Alleys 


& 


Open 9 A.M. to 12 P.M. 


— *-3k 


Tel. Conn. 






H. & N. 


FRONT STREET 
SCITUATE HARBOR 


DEPARTMENT STORES 

Cohasset, Mass. 


Compliments of 




. . . Slbe ^Eteaclms . . . 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 


iHr- *(ilrfayer Principal 


(iWrs. burner Commercial 




iffliss jMurleg Language 
;0r. 3)olpiBton English 


JAMES GRIEEIN 


JHr. j§>iuple Science 


UPHOLSTERER 


Jflflr. (irarjam History 




jHtss Jlarris Mathematics 
JHtss. HJenhtns Domestic Arts 


* 


Mr. Pnotl] Art 




iiltsa IBofuIin Music 




ilHss Sfolsont Grade 6 




(jMrs. Cole Grade 5 


ASSINIPPI, MASS. 


JUvb. (©shorn Grade 4 





Northeastern 
University 




College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation 
for the understanding of modern culture, social relations, and 
technical achievement. The purpose of this program is to give 
the student a liberal and cultural education and a vocational com- 
petence which fits him to enter some specific type of useful 
emploN ment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in 
the principles of business with specialization in Accounting, Jour- 
nalism, Banking and Finance, Public Administration, Industrial 
Administration or Marketing and Advertising. Instruction is 
through lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, 
motion pictures and talks by business men. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with pro- 
fessional courses in the fields of Civil, Mechanical (with Diesel. 
Aeronautical, and Air Conditioning options) , Electrical, Chemical, 
Industrial Engineering, and Engineering Administration. General 
engineering courses are pursued during the freshman yeai : thus the 
student need not make a final decision as to the branch of engineer- 
ing in which he wishes to speciali/e until the beginning of the 
sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperc lassmen in 
all courses, provides for a combination of practical industrial ex- 
perience with classroom instruction, ruder this plan the student is 
able to earn a portion ol his school expenses as well as to make 
business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Scien< e 

Pre-Legal Programs Available 

FOR CATALOG - MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 
Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachi si i rs 

Please send me a catalog ol the 
\~\ College ol Liberal Arts j Pre-Legal Program 

] College of Business Administration 
[2] College 1 ol Engineering 

Name 

Address 

HI 18 



Compliments of 



f. W.WCCIAVCRTHCc, 



ROCKLAND, MASS. 



THE ECONOMY of Electric 
Service can hardly be over- 
emphasized. You, too, will find 
it gives you more and costs you 
less. MODERNIZE Your HOME. 

Brockton Edison Co. 




T\ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

STRAND THEATRE 

ROCKLAND 

Where all the latest and best 
photoplays are shown. 



Chambcrlin's 

Variety Store 

255 UNION ST. ROCKLAND 

Greeting Cards 
Bridge Prizes 
Gifts 



Headquarters for 
Garden Seeds 
And Tools 



THE STORE OF CERTAIN 
SATISFACTION 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BUD JOHNSTON'S 
SERVICE STATION 



WEST HANOVER 



M. J. Condcn 

FIRESTONE TIRES 
GULF GASOLINE 



Webster St., 
NORTH HANOVER 



Compliments of 

L9AKELQ 

JEWEERy 

STORE 



zffird 



Noriucll Motor 

Salts 

YOUR 

Eord -:- Mercury 
Zcphcr :-: Lincoln 

DEALER 

NORWELL CENTER 
NORWELL, MASS. 

Tel. 102-W 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



l-t.HIS DRUG 



ROCKLAND, 



MASS